The Challenge of Religious Transformation in the 19th Century: Symposium on Friday November 24th

We are excited to announce that our afternoon symposium, ‘The Challenge of Religious Transformation in the Nineteenth-Century’, will be taking place on the 24th November 2017, from 15:00-18:30 in Helmore 201. This event will also be live streamed with Lancaster University via Google Hangout.

Speakers are: Stephen Prickett, Andrew Tate, Lesa Scholl and Elizabeth Ludlow.

Respondents include: Mark Knight, Val Purton, Clare Walker Gore and Jo Carruthers.

All are welcome, and we are really looking forward to what promises to be a rich and varied discussion. Please confirm your attendance by registering here.

Panel 1: 3-4.30

Chair: John Gardner (Anglia Ruskin University)

Stephen Prickett (University of Kent), “Airbrushing Religion: The Reconfiguration of the Victorian Image”

Respondents: Andrew Tate and Mark Knight (Lancaster University)

Andrew Tate, “The Psalms and Social Justice”

Respondents: Stephen Prickett and Val Purton (Anglia Ruskin University)

BREAK: 4.30-4.45

Panel 2: 4.45- 6.30

Chair: Marie Moxon (Anglia Ruskin University)

Lesa Scholl (University of Queensland, Australia), “The Material Eucharist: Feeding the Hungry on Sunday”

Respondents: Clare Walker Gore (Cambridge University) and Elizabeth Ludlow (Anglia Ruskin University)

Elizabeth Ludlow, “The transfigured body of the prodigal daughter in Victorian women’s poetry”

Respondents: Lesa Scholl and Jo Carruthers (Lancaster University)

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Work in Progress seminars

Our Work in Progress seminars will resume on Thursday October 5th when PhD student Sophie Phelps will discuss her current work on Dickens. This will take place between 4.30-6 in Helmore 105.

Our second work in Progress seminar will take place on Thursday Oct 19th between 4.30-6 in Helmore 105. In this, Paul Pattison will discuss his work on Middlemarch and Abderrezzaq Ghafsi will talk about his research on Dickens and Algeria.

On Thursday 26th October, unit member and PhD student Edwin Marr will deliver a preliminary version of his conference paper on Branwell Bronte. This will take place between 4-5pm in Helmore 114 and will be followed by the second session of our reading group on Shirley. 

 

Reading Group Schedule: Semester 1

I’m pleased to announce that the novel that received the most votes was Shirley. All are welcome to come to our reading group where we will discuss the novel in parts. The group will meet on Thursdays 5-6pm in Semester 1 in Hel 112. Tea, coffee and cake will be provided.

WEEK 3: 12th Oct: Chapters 1-6 (led by Lizzie Ludlow)

WEEK 5: 26th Oct: Chapters 7-12 (led by Edwin Marr)

NB. This session will follow Edwin’s first run-through of his paper, ‘Unwept Deaths–Inglorious War’ Battlefield Deaths and Masculine Grief in Branwell Brontë’s War Poetry, which he will be delivering at the Branwell Symposium in Leeds in November. This will run from 4-5pm and all are welcome.

WEEK 7: 9th November: Chapters 13-18 (led by Kathy Rees)

WEEK 9: 23rd November: Chapters 19-25 (led by Chris Lyon)

WEEK 11: 7th December: Chapters 26-30 (led by Marie Moxon)

21st Dec: Chapters 31-37 (led by Anne-Louise Russell)

 

 

 

 

Reading Group: Semester 1 2017-18

Dear members,

I’m looking forward to re-starting our reading group in Semester 1. The current plan is to hold the group fortnightly on Thursdays between 5 and 6pm. At our last Middlemarch meeting, 3 potential novels were selected: Sarah Grand’s The Beth Book, Charlotte Bronte’s Shirley, and Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov. Please vote for your preference here.

Best wishes,

Lizzie

The Gaskell Journal: Joan Leach Memorial Graduate Student Essay Prize 2018

Deadline for submissions: 1st February 2018

The Gaskell Journal runs a biennial Graduate Student Essay Prize in honour of Joan Leach MBE, founder of the Gaskell Society.

Terms

The essay competition is open to all graduate students currently registered for an MA or PhD in Victorian Studies. Entries are invited that offer an original contribution to the field of Gaskell studies, whether by reading her works in relation to Victorian cultural, religious, aesthetic and scientific contexts, or through innovative close readings enlightened by critical theory, or a comparative study connecting Gaskell’s with another author’s work.  Essays will be shortlisted by the Gaskell Journal Editorial Board, with the final judgment being made by a leading scholar in Gaskell studies.

Prize

The winning essay will be published in the Gaskell Journal (subject to appropriate revisions), and its author will receive £200 from the Gaskell Society, and a complimentary copy of the Journal. High quality runners-up will also be considered for publication.

Conditions

Essays should be 6000-7000 words, and not under consideration for publication elsewhere. Please see the Gaskell Journal website for the stylesheet (MHRA with endnotes), and for the form to submit with your anonymised essay: www.gaskelljournal.co.uk

Please submit these directly to the Editor Dr Rebecca Styler rstyler@lincoln.ac.uk by/on 1st February 2018, who can also answer any inquiries.

 

Middlemarch: ‘Unabridged’

middlemarch-tl crop

[cropped] Eliot’s Manuscript of Middlemarch © Jonathan Garnault Ouvry / British Library

Guest Post from Unit Member Kathy Rees: on reading George Eliot’s Middlemarch again, abridgement, and the significance of paratext mottoes. 

 

I was very excited when the Research Unit Reading Group embarked on George Eliot’s Middlemarch (1871), but also slightly stressed, because I knew that I didn’t have time to re-read it.  The obvious solution was audible.com, and I imagined myself happily absorbed in the dramas and doings at Tipton Grange and Freshitt Hall while I trailed around Tesco or stirred the soup.

At the point of purchase I was puzzled to note that the length of the ‘Audible Studios’ edition, narrated by Maureen O’Brien (£21), was 32 hours and 28 minutes, while the ‘Naxos’ edition, narrated by Juliet Stevenson (£37), was 35 hours and 40 minutes.  Given that both versions were emphatically marked UNABRIDGED, it seemed outrageous to pay £16 for an additional 3 hours and 12 minutes of an amorphous ‘something’ – maybe pregnant pauses, or musical intervals – so, like dear Mr Brooke, I had good intentions but was ‘spending as little money as possible in carrying them out”.[i] The outcome of my penny-pinching provoked the subject of this blog.

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